Local Wine Co's Blog


Homemade Eggnog Recipe by cdbakunas
December 17, 2012, 2:24 pm
Filed under: Deliciousness, Food and Drink | Tags: , , ,

Homemade Eggnog. What’s better than eggnog and whiskey when the temperature has dropped to freezing, the kids are in bed, the Christmas tree lights are on and you and yours can quietly snuggle on the couch? Don’t buy that store made eggnog crap, it is highly processed, filled with preservatives and overloaded with refined sugar. This is a quick and simple recipe.

Four eggs (separate yolk from whites), 1/3 cup evaporated cane sugar (+1T cane sugar, keep to the side), 1 pint of whole milk, 1 cup of heavy cream, 1/2 teaspoon of freshly grated nutmeg.

Ok, start with the yolks and slowly whisk in 1/3 cup of sugar, then add milk, cream and nutmeg. In another bowl whisk the egg whites till you have soft peaks. Now add the 1T of evaporated cane sugar that you had put to the side and continue to whisk until you have stiff peaks. Chill the egg/milk/cream/nutmeg mixture and then slowly whisk in the egg whites. Serve at your convenience once your eggnog is chilled. Add bourbon or whiskey for the adult version.



Holiday Recipes from Local by cdbakunas
December 17, 2012, 2:22 pm
Filed under: Deliciousness, Food and Drink | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Don’t know about  you but around the holidays we are kicking ass and cooking in the kitchen, a lot. For most of us our lives revolve around food, wine, all things delicious and sharing with our friends and family. Thus we wanted to share with you a couple of our favorite recipes for the holiday time of year.

Braised Monkfish. Now don’t be afraid of this recipe because of the enormous quantity of cream and butter. Remember, fat is good for your body, especially healthy fats like organic, non pasteurized milk and butter.

RECIPE: 4 pieces of Monkfish (6oz), season with salt and pepper. Place to the side.

Butter Sauce: 8 ounces of organic cream, 2lbs of organic butter (if you have a farm that you can get non-pastuerized milk products that is the best), 8 ounces of water. Let your butter warm to room temperature. Combine cream and water, bring to a boil, then whisk in your butter. Emulsify in a blender and keep warm in the oven. We’ll come right back to this. TIP: A Dutch Oven works great for braising the monkfish.

Prepare your vegetables prior to braising the monk fish. We recommend seasonal vegetables. Brussel sprouts peak from September to February and are fantastic with this dish. Here’s my favorite winter time way to make brussel sprouts.

Shaved Brussel Sprouts:  1lb brussel sprouts, 1/2 lb pancetta, 1 T olive oil. Shave the brussel sprouts into very thin slices using a mandoline. Prep your pancetta by cutting 1/4″ long strips and sear in a pot for about 5 minutes with olive oil until the edges are crispy. Add the shaved brussel sprouts and continue to stir until tender. Don’t over cook the sprouts, otherwise they’ll lose texture and color. Serve hot.

Take your four pieces of monkfish (that has been seasoned) and put into the Dutch oven that is holding your cream/butter/water emulsion. Cook the monkfish for 12-14 minutes.

To serve use a large, flat boil. Spoon in a small mound of your brussel sprout/pancetta while it is hot and spoon a few table spoons of your cream/butter/water emulsion from the Dutch oven and pour over the sprouts. Season with salt and pepper to taste. In each bowl place one piece of monkfish over the brussel sprouts and garnish with finely zested meyer lemon. Voila!

Best Lentils Ever. My mom used to make all sorts of beans and lentils from scratch and it all sucked. Sorry mom, hope you never read this. I came across an Italian lentils recipe that we’ve modified over the years. Add any type of meat if you want this to become a main course. I recommend braised meats, especially pork belly, or savory sausages.

RECIPE: 8oz dried lentils, 2 cloves of garlic, fresh sage leaves or rosemary sprig, 1/4 cup EVOO, 1/4 cup red wine vinegar, 3 carrots, 1/2 onion, 2 celery stalks.

Pour 6 cups of water into a sauce pan and bring to a boil. Add a pinch of salt. Next add the lentils, herbs and garlic. Cook for about 20minutes until the lentils are tender but remain firm. Strain and place on the side.

In another saucepan we are going to saute a mirepoix. Rough cut the carrots, onion and celery then in a food processor chop until the mirepoix is finely chopped. Add 1T olive oil and saute the processed mirepoix until browned slightly.

In a large bowl combine sauteed mirepoix and lentils, add olive oil and red wine vinegar and toss with sea salt (Maldon is my preferred) and fresh cracked black pepper. Best lentils ever.

Homemade Eggnog. What’s better than eggnog and whiskey when the temperature has dropped to freezing, the kids are in bed, the Christmas tree lights are on and you and yours can quietly snuggle on the couch? Don’t buy that store made eggnog crap, it is highly processed, filled with preservatives and overloaded with refined sugar. This is a quick and simple recipe.

Four eggs (separate yolk from whites), 1/3 cup evaporated cane sugar (+1T cane sugar, keep to the side), 1 pint of whole milk, 1 cup of heavy cream, 1/2 teaspoon of freshly grated nutmeg.

Ok, start with the yolks and slowly whisk in 1/3 cup of sugar, then add milk, cream and nutmeg. In another bowl whisk the egg whites till you have soft peaks. Now add the 1T of evaporated cane sugar that you had put to the side and continue to whisk until you have stiff peaks. Chill the egg/milk/cream/nutmeg mixture and then slowly whisk in the egg whites. Serve at your convenience once your eggnog is chilled. Add bourbon or whiskey for the adult version.



Don’t Be Afraid of Your Absinthe by cdbakunas
November 9, 2012, 8:52 am
Filed under: Making Cocktails | Tags: , ,

Cocktail Corner November

Last week I spent some time talking with Graham Wasilition, creator and founder of Tenneyson Absinthe Royal . As usual we got to talking cocktails. One of the many unique things about Tenneyson, amidst the world of absinthe, is that Graham specifically made rhymes with his botanicals and flowers so that Tenneyson could parallel certain aromatics and qualities of gin. When you smell Tenneyson it is unmistakably absinthe, additionally there is a deep savory aromatic that hits you. When you stop to think about it “un-gin” cocktails can go sky high with Absinthe (and as you know I love gin, we make gin, we bath in gin). Graham mentioned, “The Un-Gin is such a good jumping off point for the category and it suits Tenneyson extremely well. Not taking away any of the quality and absinthe backbone but it gives a relatable place for barmen and women to start to conjure up ideas and bring new excitement to a pigeonholed category.”

What we wanted to start today was a monthly dialogue on cocktails and have this be as interactive as you would like. So many of you (readers) are such accomplished bartenders that a rolling dialogue about absinthe and cocktails this month should be fun.

Cocktails for thought here are some of our un-gin formulas (I prefer the term formulas over recipes. Because a recipe is something you follow, but your bar, my bar, your equipment and mine and your rail and my rail just aren’t the same, so please take liberties with these formulas).

And thank you Graham Wasilition for the lively dialogue, the great suggestions and the incredible Tenneyson Absinthe.

Gin Classics that do very well with a Tenneyson substitute:

Negroni, Tom Collins, Corpse Reviver #2

Fall/Winter Seasonal Cocktail Suggestions:

Tenneyson Cider

The Tenneyson Negroni:

Just use classic recipe but replace some of gin with Tenneyson

0.75 oz Campari

0.5 oz Sweet Vermouth

0.75 oz Tenneyson

0.5 oz Gin

Orange Peel Garnish

The Tenneyson Tom Collins (Tenney Fizz):

Replace Gin in classic recipe with Tenneyson

1 oz Tenneyson

0.5 oz simple syrup

1 oz Citrus (lemon, lemon/orange, grapefruit)

Top with Soda and Citrus wheel

Really Reviving Corpse Reviver #2:

Kind of flips the cocktail around…Play with ratio of Gin to Tenneyson from classic recipe…normally 1oz. gin vs. 1 dash absinthe

0.5 oz Gin

0.5 oz Tenneyson

1 oz Cointreau

1 oz Lillet Blanc

1 oz Lemon

Thought Provoking Cider:

1 oz Tenneyson

3-4 oz Apple Cider

0.5 oz honey

5 dash of Bittermens Mole Bitters




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